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Course Atlas: Spring 2009

 


NBB Core Classes | NBB Seminars | NBB Classes | Anthropology | Biology | Chemistry | Philosophy | Psychology | Other Electives


Core Classes

NBB 201: Foundations of Behavior
S. Gouzoules, Konner, TTH, 10:00-11:15, MAX: 155 (NBB - 140, ANTH - 15), Anthro Room 303

(same as ANTH 200)

Content: This course presents an introduction to evolutionary processes and biological bases of behavior. Lectures and readings will be organized around a developmental and life history perspective and will emphasize the importance of context in biological mechanisms and the interaction of importance of contexts in biological mechanisms and the interaction of social life, behavior, and cognition. Examples drawn especially from humans and nonhuman primates will be used to place human behavior in the contexts of other species and to illustrate the dual inheritance of biology and culture in our species. Topics covered will include: evolutionary mechanisms, adaption, phylogenetic constraints, neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms of behavior, life history theory, developmental programs, principles of allometry, sexual selection and alternative reproductive strategies, social bonds and socialization, and the cognitive bases of social interaction.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: Grades will be based on two hourly exams and a final.

Prerequisite: Biology 141

NBB 301: Introduction to Neurobiology
Frenzel, TTH, 1:00-2:15, MAX:30 (NBB - 22, Biol - 8), 1462 Clifton Road, Rm 100C

(same as BIOL 360)

Content: The first part of this course will focus on the electrophysiological properties of neurons, a crucial first step for understanding brain function. We will discuss the generation and propagation of action potentials, neurotransmitter release, and how ion channels and receptors determine the membrane potential and ultimately whether or not the action potential is passed to the next neuron. Also, we will examine the plasticity of this system and how the synapse is changed by learning. The second part of this course will expand upon these neuronal properties to investigate the processing of somatosensory and motor information.

Texts: Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science and Behavior, 4th Edition. (McGraw-Hill)

Particulars: Exams: Three 1-1/2 hour in-class exams and a comprehensive final. There will also be a required review session for one hour each week.

Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 141 and 142, Biology 141 and 142 is required; completion or concurrent enrollment in Intro Physics is strongly recommended.

NBB 302: Behavioral Neuroscience
Neill, MWF, 10:40-11:30, MAX: 150 (NBB - 140),( Psyc - 10), Anth 303

(same as PSYC 353)

Content: The goal of this course is to present an integrated coverage of work at the intersection of animal behavior, evolution, and cellular/systems neuroscience. The course surveys the major areas of behavioral neuroscience.

Texts: None.

Prerequisite: NBB 301/Biology 360; or completion of Biology 444 or Psychology 320. (Concurrent enrollment in NBB 201 and NBB 302 is strongly discouraged)

 

Seminars

 

NBB 190S: Freshman Seminar: Evolution; Conceptions and Misconceptions

Marsteller, TTH, 1:00-2:15, Max:18, Woodruff Library Rm 214

Content: This seminar course will address conceptions and misconceptions of the theory of evolution. We will begin with a discussion of theory and evidence from a scientific perspective. Using web material (for example http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evosite/misconceps/index.shtml), readings, discussion, and PBL exercises, will will examine how the conception of evolution has changed over time. We will examine major misconceptions about evolution, including the idea of progress, randomness, chance, and necessity. Current debates about "intelligent design" will also be considered.

Text: Gould, Stephen J. Ever Since Darwin: Reflections in Natural History. (W.W. Norton)

Particulars: Open to Freshmen only. Grades will be based on learning issues and products from the PBL exercises, four on-line reflections, participation, a group class presentation, and a group project.

NBB 190S: How to Interpret Behavior you Didn't See

Martin, MWF 9:35-10:25, Max: 18Max: 18 (ENVS 9/NBB 9), Math and Science Rm W507

Content: The purpose of this class is to examine how behavior can be interpreted reliably without actually witnessing it, which tests (and sometimes falsifies) the conventional wisdom of "seeing is believing." Inference will be used as a scientific methodology where students describe the products of behavior in order to interpret the processes of behavior, which in some cases provides more details about an organism's behavior than if it had been observed. Primary emphasis will be on how to track animals (including humans) in both natural and human-made settings, but will also include problem-based learning in paleontology and forensic methods. Fiction and its depiction of inferential reasoning used to interpret behavior will provide examples of the long history of this form of science in the popular imagination. Environmental factors and how they influence the behavior of both plants and animals is a key part of interpreting unwitnessed behavior. Accordingly, most classes will be conducted outdoors.


Texts: Animal Tracking Basics (2007), by Jon Young and Tiffany Morgan (Stackpole Books); Scats and Tracks of the Southeast (2001), by James Halfpenny (Falcon Press).


Particulars: Open only to freshmen. The majority of classes will be conducted outdoors, with one weekend field trip scheduled.

 

NBB 321: Behavioral Neuroendocrinology of Sex
Wallen, TTH, 2:30-3:45, MAX: 40 (NBB-20, PSYC-20), White Hall 102

(same as PSYC 321)

Content: This course examines the role hormones, particularly steroid hormones, play in the development and activation of reproductive behaviors in animals and humans. In addition, the role of hormones in the development of sex differences in the brain and behavior will be explored. The first third of this course covers biological mechanisms of hormone production and the regulation and function of the neuroendocrine system. A background in biology is helpful, but neither required, nor necessary. The concepts necessary to understand the biology of the neuroendocrine system are developed in class. The last two-thirds of the course covers the behavioral effects of hormones and is divided into the immediate effects of hormones (activation) and long-term effects of hormones (organization). Research covers both animals and humans with everything from sex changing fish to sex change in humans topics for consideration. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the manner in which hormones produce physical modifications and modulate sexual behavior in a variety of species.

Readings: Selected Reserve Readings

NBB 361WR:  Experimental Neurobiology Project lab

Frenzel, MW, 2:00-5:00, MAX: 8, 1462 Clifton Road 226

Content: This project lab is designed for juniors and seniors who are interested in research design and analysis and want “hands-on” lab experience. The students work on current research projects of NBB faculty to learn basic molecular, cellular, electrophysiology and imaging techniques. The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to current concepts, analytical methods, and laboratory techniques. For the writing portion of the course, students write a NIH Pre-doctoral grant based on a topic of their choice.

Text: none

Prerequisites: NBB301 and permission of instructor.

NBB 370S: The Path to Discovery: PD & AD

Roesch, MWF, 11:45-12:35, MAX: 16, ECIT room 214 Woodruff Library

Content: What were the trendy techniques, cultural influences and bizarre events that lead to scientific breakthroughs? From major works that first described the diseases, to clinical, histological, technical and genetic advances, we will explore how our understanding of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease has evolved. This class will be taught in student-centered, active and collaborative discussion sessions in which we will trace the major experiments and discoveries that shaped our current ideas about these devastating diseases. We will use the primary and secondary literature as a springboard into our own deeper investigation of the topics. Grading will be based on class participation, weekly short investigative papers, two collaborative projects and one research  proposal.

Particulars: This is a seminar-style advanced topics course for science majors. NBB 301/BIO 360 is a necessary prerequisite or co-requisite.

Readings: Journal articles and selected reserve readings

NBB 370S: Math Concepts in the Neurosciences   Cancelled

Olifer;  MWF, 9:35 – 10:25;  Max: NBB 10, Bio 5;  1462 Clifton Road, Room R226


(same as BIO 470)

 Content: This course is intended for NBB majors and Biology majors interested in mathematical models and quantitative reasoning.  Several mathematical concepts   fundamentally important in multiple areas of biology will be considered.  The concepts will include differential and difference equations, information measures, stochastic processes, and others.  The concepts will be introduced in the context of specific problems in the neurosciences to demonstrate how these concepts really work in biology.  The exemplary problems will be from neuronal coding, neuronal network dynamics, and learning in neuronal networks.  My ideal students need no prior knowledge of college mathematics.  Everything will be introduced from “scratch”, on the basis of the high school mathematics.  The course will give you a foundation for understanding mathematical models in modern research literature.  The development of the course was funded by a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship.

Textbooks: 1) F.R. Adler.  Modeling the Dynamics of Life.  Brooks/Cole, 2005.  2) P.Dayan and L.F.Abbott. Theoretical Neuroscience: Computational and Mathematical Modeling of Neural Systems.  MIT Press, 2001. 

Particulars: Grading will be based on regular homework assignments, a midterm exam, and a final exam.  There will be a discussion section every week to ensure understanding of the course material.  This course will fulfill elective credit for NBB and Biology majors.

Prerequisite: NBB 301/ Bio 360 will be a useful background; knowledge of calculus is not required but is a plus.

 

NBB 370S: Movement Control

Crutcher, TTH, 10:00-11:15, 1462 Clifton Rd, Room 226

Content:  This course is designed to explore motor behavior and the neural control of movement.  The content of the course will include biomechanics, the musculoskeletal system, and the organization and circuitry of the spinal cord and supraspinal motor areas.  We will also cover functional aspects of movement including reflexes, central pattern generators, locomotion, posture and balance, the control of eye movements, reaching and grasping, motor learning and plasticity, as well as functional imaging of the motor system.  Emphasis will be placed on the roles that different components of the motor system play in the control of movement.  Derangements of motor control that result from damage to or pathology of these areas will be described as well as some modern treatments for motor impairments.  Finally, we will discuss characteristics of motor behavior as well as theories of motor control.

Text:  Principles of Neuroscience, 4th edition, Kandel, Schwartz and Jessell, eds. plus assigned readings.

Particulars:  NBB 301 (or permission of the instructor) is a prerequisite.  Grade will be based on class discussion, midterm and final exams.  Maximum class size is fifteen

 

NBB370S: Animal Intelligence

Marino, TTH 1:00 – 2:15, MAX: 15, 1462 Clifton Road, Room 231

Content: Over the recent years there has been an explosion of exciting findings on the intelligence of other animals. In this course we will explore the field of study on animal intelligence, covering evolution, biology, and ecology of intelligence in the animal kingdom.  We will also investigate questions about the nature of intelligence as a concept for both humans and other animals, and learn to be rigorous thinkers about evidence for animal intelligence.   We will draw upon both cutting-edge experimental findings as well as observational data.

Text: TBA

 

NBB 424S:  Medical Neuropathology
Easterling, TTH, 4:00 - 5:15, MAX: 40, 1462 Clifton Rd, 308

Content: The primary focus of this course will be to provide an overview of the organic foundations of selected neurological disorders. The first part of the course will be an introduction to the functional neuroanatomy of the "normal" brain. The second part of the course will introduce some clinical aspects related to damage/degeneration in these areas; such as stroke, ischemia, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Epilepsy, amnesias/dementias paying attention to traditional neuropsychological assessment/tests that differentiate among them.

Particulars: Credit 4 hr, graded

Texts: TBA

Prerequisites: NBB301

 

NBB 425: Brain Imaging
Marino, TTH,  2:30-3:45, MAX 25: NBB-20, Psych-5,1462 Clifton Road, Room 100C

( Same as PSYC 425)

Content: This course will focus on the application of imaging technology (Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and others) to the study of brain anatomy and function. The goal is for you to obtain a working knowledge of these techniques and the strengths and limitations of each. Our topics will range from historically well established methods to new methods on the horizon of basic and clinical research

Text: TBA

 

 

NBB 470S: Clinical Neurology Study
Hopkins, Lennard, F, TBA, MAX: 5, Rm TBA

Content: Selected undergraduates will have an opportunity to correlate experience with actual patient(s) with the science behind the diagnosis. During their time in the clinics, students will act as a 'patient assistant," helping patients who may have partial paralysis or loss of sensation. They will record the details of the patient's history and neurological findings as the medical student and faculty member perform the exam. Students will choose an individual patient to present and will conduct research on the patient's neurological problem. Medical student mentors will be selected to help develop the writing and poster projects. At the end of the semester, students will present a poster and paper to a faculty committee, post their work on learnlink to share with peers, and possibly publish their work.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: Permission Only. This course has been designed for juniors or seniors with outstanding academic records and strong interpersonal skills



NBB 470S: "The Brain(Addiction), History and Culture
Kushner, T, 1:00-4:00, MAX: 21 (7-NBB, 7-IDS, 7-BSHE), Callaway S423

(same as IDS 485S)

Content: This seminar will explore the construction, meaning, and mpact of addiction in historical psychological,and neurobiological perspective. Particular attention will be given to the putative neurobiological mechanisms associated with addiction and consciousness altering substances and behaviors. Biological and psychological explanations that have been and continue to be used to explain the etiology and meaning f addiction will be examined. This exploration will include considerations of the role of social, cultural, and population differences as they may relate to addictive behaviors.

 

NBB 470S: Roots of Modern Neuroscience

Otis & Lennard, Wed 2-5, MAX: 15 (NBB 10, IDS 5), 1462 Clifton Rd, Room 231

(same as IDS 385)

Content:  This course will trace contemporary issues in neuroscience from their origins in the 18th and 19th centuries to new frontiers. We will use a combination of literature, film, and laboratory demonstrations. Among the topics treated will be localization vs. holism, visionaries and their models, conflicts and controversies between scientists and their students, and philosophical concepts vs. instrument- based inquiry. The readings will consist mainly of primary sources supplemented by occasional contemporary essays, films, and historical laboratory demonstrations. Some examples of the readings are papers by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, Hermann von Helmholtz, Sir Charles Sherrington, and Sigmund Freud; the novels Frankenstein and Neuromancer; and the film Pi.

Particulars: Historical Research Paper of 15 pages with a draft

Two short in-class presentations

 

 

NBB 470S: Neurofunction and Artificial Intelligence

Choi, Fri, 2-5, MAX: 15 (NBB 10, IDS 5), 1462 Clifton Rd, Room 231

(same as IDS 385)

Content:  This course has three goals.  First, to review, briefly and at a high level, the history of artificial intelligence.  Second, to examine some emerging ideas about how the brain collects, stores, and processes information, as well as makes predictions.  Third, to bring these two threads together to consider how continuing advances in computer technology are being – and might be-- harnessed to simulate elements of brain function.  We will view this harnessing primarily from the standpoint of testing and advancing neuroscience understandings about how the brain works, but we will also examine some practical and larger implications.  Can modeling brain processes point the way to developing therapeutically useful prosthetic devices?  How about more capable machines than we have today -- even “intelligent” machines?  What would be the ethical implications of such developments?  Discussions will be guided by core readings and invited guest faculty experts.

Particulars: Perspective paper of 15 pages

Two short in-class presentations

Prerequisites: permission of instructor. NBB 301 recommended

NBB470SWR (00P): Neuroscience Live
Jaeger, TTh, 4:00-5:15, MAX: 20, 1462 Clifton Road, Room 126

Content: This advanced seminar covers current topics of neuroscience research and the intellectual and experimental challenges involved. It is a hands-on writing intensive seminar, where you learn to read and critique research papers, design experiments, and write a grant proposal. The authors of the research papers chosen are eminent Emory researchers, and you will be able to interact with them in a 'live' format, after having read their work.

Text: Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science, 4th Edition. (McGraw-Hill) (NOTE: This text is recommended (but not required) and will mainly be used as a resource of background information.)

Particulars: Prerequisites: Biology 141 and 142. Pre- or corequisite: Biology 360/NBB 301. The course grade will be assigned 60% based on writing assignments and 40% based on powerpoint presentations in class. Permission of instructor is required.

 

NBB470SWR: Perspectives in Chemistry: Proteins, Patients, Prisoners
Cross listed with PHYS 380SWRS, SOC 389SWR, NBB 470SWR, PSY 385SWR, REL 370RSWR, WS 475SWR

Lynn - TT 1:00-2:15: Emerson Hall E401

Content: This seminar will explore the connections among the topics of proteins, patients, and prisoners, and how they relate to your health and your world. You will engage in discussions on how your education could be making you sick, watch the movement of proteins that keep you healthy, participate in hands-on experiments to see how cells interact, hear from women living in prison, enjoy aspects of self-discovery, and even experience altered states of mind.
Divided into five modules taught by Emory researchers in different disciplines, you will learn how these scholars from diverse disciplines draw on the same process of discovery to gain a deeper understanding of the world. Students will learn methods to conduct research and scholarly inquiry. We will guide you through the steps of the process from critical analysis of primary literature through reporting your work in a peer reviewed journal format. You will also be challenged to use technology to teach your independent discoveries to a general audience. This course will be an exciting and rewarding capstone experience for you that will transform the way you view and are able to capture that unknown beyond Emory.


NBB470SWR: Perspectives in Chemistry: Taken out of Context
Cross listed with PHYS 380SWRS, NBB 470SWR, PSY 385SWR, REL 370RSWR

Lynn - TT, 2:30-3:45: Emerson Hall E401

Content: Often, “taken out of context” has a negative connotation, but in this course we will take a step back and explore context as a necessary component in understanding our own identity and place in the world. Join us for a journey through current research and discoveries here on Emory’s campus. Together, we will relate microscopic observations to macroscopic properties of materials, study complex processes of protein-mediated diseases, investigate empathy in non-human primates, and examine diverse education and religious experiences.

Divided into five modules taught by Emory researchers in different disciplines, you will learn how these scholars from diverse disciplines draw on the same process of discovery to gain a deeper understanding of the world. Students will learn methods to conduct research and scholarly inquiry. We will guide you through the steps of the process from critical analysis of primary literature through reporting your work in a peer reviewed journal format. You will also be challenged to use technology to teach your independent discoveries to a general audience. This course will be an exciting and rewarding capstone experience for you that will transform the way you view and are able to capture that unknown beyond Emory.


NBB 482: Frontiers in Neuroscience (New Course)

Easterling, F, 12:00-1:30, MAX: 30, TBA

Content: This course that will allow our NBB undergraduates to experience the Frontiers in Neuroscience series that the Graduate Program in Neuroscience offers for their students.

Texts: Students will attend "cutting edge" Neuroscience seminars/talks and take notes on them. Notes will be turned in at the NBB office that same afternoon. It is expected that students receiving an "S", in part, will have missed no more than 3 seminars/semester.
will consist of primary papers, reviews, and book chapters. There will not be a required text though students will find “Principles of Neural Science” (4th Edition) by Kandel et al. and Basic Neurochemistry (6th Edition), which is available online, useful for background reading.

NBB 495A: Honors Research

Easterling, M, 3:00-4:00, 1462 Clifton Rd Room 231

(Meets every other week)

Content: Fall, Spring, Summer. Open to senior NBB majors enrolled inthe College Honors Program. Honors research in neurobiology/behavior. Registrants attend biweekly meetings to present progress reports of their ongoing research, discuss how to write proposals and papers, and give oral presentations.

Pre/co-requisites: Permission of instructor and NBB 221 (Psychology 230 not accepted). Cannot be taken conurrently with NBB 497WR or NBB 499R. A maximum of four hours of NBB 495A, 495BWR, , 497R, 497WR, or 499R accepted as an elective toward the NBB major.(Forms in NBB Ofice)

NBB 495BWR: Honors Research
Easterling, M, 3:00-4:00pm, 1462 Clifton Road  Rm 231
(Students meet every other week)

Content: Fall, Spring, Summer. Open to senior NBB majors enrolled in the College Honors Program. Honors research in neurobiology/behavior. Registrants attend biweekly meetings to present progress reports of their ongoing research, discuss how to write proposals, papers, and give oral presentations. To receive credit for the course and to satisfy the senior-year writing requirement, a student thesis must be accepted by the Honors Program.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; NBB 221 (Psychology 230 not accepted); NBB 495A (with permission of instructor, may substitute NBB 499R) Cannot be taken concurrently with NBB 499R; may not receive credit for NBB 495BWRa and NBB 497WR under the direction of the same faculty mentor. A maximum of four hours of NBB 495A, 495BWR, 497R, 497WR, or 499R accepted as an elective toward the NBB major.(Forms in NBB Office)

NBB 497R: Supervised Reading

Content: Fall, Spring, Summer. Credit, one to four hours. Independent, faculty-mentored research; designed as a prelude to conducting laboratory research under the same mentor.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Cannot be taken conurrently with NBB 497WR. A maximum of four hours of NBB 495A, 495BWR, 497R, 497WR, or 499R accepted as an elective toward the NBB major.(Forms in NBB Ofice)

NBB 497WR: Supervised Writing

Content: Fall, Spring, Summer. Independent, faculty-mentored research and writing, with major writing assignment(s) accounting for at least 60% of the grade.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Cannot be taken concurrently with NBB 497R. may not receive credit for NBB 497WR and 495BWR under the direction of the same faculty mentor. A maximum of four hours of NBB 495A, 495BWR, 497R, 497WR, or 499R accepted as an elective toward the NBB major. (Forms in NBB Office)

NBB 499R: Undergraduate Research
Easterling, M, 3:00-4:00pm, 1462 Clifton Road, Room 231
(Students meet every other week)

Content: Fall, Spring, Summer. Credit, one to four hours.Up to eight hours may be taken, but a maximum of four hours of NBB 495A,, 495BWR, 497R, 497WR, or 499R accepted as an elective toward the NBB major. Independent research in neurobiology and behavior. Registrants attend biweekly meetings to present progress reports of their ongoing research, discuss how to write proposals, papers, and give oral presentations.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor:(for enrollment in a second semester, NBB 221 (Psychology 230 not accepted); cannot be taken concurrently with NBB 495A, 495BWR or 497WR. (Forms in NBB Office)

 

 

Anthropology

ANTH 306SWR: Primate Mating Strategies
Whitten, MWF, 12:50-1:40, Max: 18,

Content: This course will focus on primate mating behavior from the perspectives of sexual selection, evolution, and ecology. Mating systems and patterns of sexual activity in a variety of primate species will be reviewed and compared in light of current theories on intrasexual competition and mate choice. Genetic success will be compared to evidence for mating success and mate selection. Alternative strategies and tactics will be compared within and among species.

Texts:

• Why Is Sex Fun? Jared Diamond
• Sexual Selection Malte Andersson
• Sexual Selection in Primates Peter Kappeler and Carel van Schaik

Journal articles and book chapters

Prerequisites: ANT 302 or by permission of instructor. Requires a prior class in primate behavior and some familiarity with concepts of animal behavior and evolutionary theory.

GER information:this course satisfies both the undergraduate writing and the post-freshman semina rrequirements.

The course will be taught as a seminar format. Theory and patterns of behavior are conveyed through discussion of assigned readings. Attendance and participation in discussions are required. Requirements include several oral presentations on assigned readings, a 15 page term paper, and reaction papers. Grades:

-Term paper 40%
-Presentations, participation, & quizzes 30%
-Reaction papers 30%

ANT 210-000: Human Biology: A Life Cycle Approach

TTh 11:30-12:45 MAX: 35 Rilling

Content: Human biology from conception to senescence. Principles of evolution and genetics relevant to the life cycle. Fetal development, birth, brain growth in infancy and early childhood, hormonal bases of gender, physical growth, puberty, adolescence, adult sexuality, pregnancy, birth (mother's viewpoint), lactation, physical and mental health and disease in adulthood, menopause, aging, senescence, death. Comparative examples from other species and other cultures. All aspects of growth and development will be considered, but somewhat greater emphasis will be given to neurological and neuroendocrine functions underlying behavior and reproduction.

Texts:TBA.

Particulars: This course should serve as an introduction to human biology for students in disciplines outside biology. There are no prerequisites, but a year of high school biology is desirable. A willingness to work hard is essential. It should be viewed as comparable in difficulty to a basic college biology course, but with emphasis on the human life cycle that should make it particularly relevant to students who may anticipate no further training in biology.

ANT 333-000: Disease and Human Behavior

 

TTH 2:30-3:45 MAX: 35 Konner

Content: This course will survey a wide range of important human diseases at a level suitable for students with little scientific background but a keen interest in health and illness. Students who plan a career touching on disease in some way but unlikely to become doctors or nurses—for example, in health education, public health services, health care administration, hospital-based social work, medical anthropology, medical sociology, medical economics, or aid to international development—will find that it provides a basic foundation for thinking about all the things that go wrong with the human body. We will spend one class on each of about 24 disorders or syndromes. The choice of diseases for study was motivated, first, by their importance in the experience of either people in the developing world (malaria, diarrhea, tuberculosis, etc.), the developed world (coronary artery disease, stroke, breast cancer), or both (cervical cancer, AIDS, depression). Second, the chosen diseases reflect instructor’s desire to touch on most major body systems and, more important, to illuminate all major processes—genetic, physiological, nutritional, infectious, immunological, psychosocial, and cultural—that contribute to disease. Students completing this course should be in a position to approach many other diseases using the principles mastered in relation to those covered in the course.

Texts: A medical dictionary will be required for purchase. Other readings TBA.

Particulars: This course may be used to fulfill the "Social Science and Medicine" or the "Human Biology" requirement areas for Anthropology Department majors (but not both).  Two in-class examinations (30 points each), and a cumulative final (40 points).


 

 

Biology

 

BIOL 325: Primate Social Psychology
de Waal (Psychology), TT, 11:30-12:45, MAX: 30, TBA

(same as PSYC 325)

Content: Following a general introduction to primatology, this course covers recent progress in the growing field of primate social behavior. Topics range from aggression and dominance (e.g., warfare and power politics among chimpanzees) to affiliation, sex, and peaceful coexistence (e.g., parental behavior, behavioral sex differences, conflict resolution.) The evolution of the large brain and remarkable intelligence of primates has been explained as related to the complexity of their societies: survival in such societies requires sophisticated social skills and a thorough understanding of the relationship network. Course segments focus on the motivational and cognitive processes underlying coalition formation, reciprocal exchange of benefits, reconciliation following conflict, and the origin of moral systems. Parallels with human behavior will be discussed.

Texts: Required reading include two books and articles assigned at the beginning of the course.

Prerequisites: Biology 141 and 142

BIOL 336: Human Physiology
Seigler, MWF, 8:30-9:20, MAX: 140, 1462 Clifton Road, Room 230

Content: A study of human physiology emphasizing homeostatic mechanisms of integrated body functions. Topics include neurophysiology, endocrinology, muscle physiology, cardiology, immunology, respiration, gastroenterology, and urology.

Text: Widmaier, E., H. Raff, and K. Strang. Vander et. al's Human Physiology, 10th Edition (with FREE Art Notebook). (McGraw-Hill)

Particulars: Four in-class tests. Credit may be applied towards the Biology or NBB major for either Biology 336 or Biology 346, but NOT both.

Prerequisites: Biology 141 and 142 or permission of instructor.

BIOLOGY 341 (000): Evolutionary Biology

de Roode / Gerardo , MWF, 10:40-11:30, MAX: 60, 1462 Clifton Road, Room 308

Content: A study of the factors that cause genetic change and of the evolutionary consequences of such changes. Topics include population genetics, adaptation and natural selection, evolution of genes, proteins and genomes, sexual selection, kin selection, speciation, and diversification of taxa. Emphasis on molecular, genetic, ecological, and evolutionary factors related to variation and adaptation to environment, and constraints on adaptation.

Text: Freeman, Scott and Jon C. Herron. Evolutionary Analysis, 4th Edition. (Prentice-Hall)

Particulars: Three tests and a comprehensive final. Discussion of current and classic literature and group presentations will be required. Prerequisites: Biology 141 and 142.

 

BIOL 440S: Animal Communication
H. Gouzoules, TTh, 1:00-2:15, MAX:8, TBA

(same as Psych 440S; MAX:8)

Content: From the dance of the honey bee, the "honest advertising" of frogs, and the question of why birds sing, to the symbolic abilities of primates and dolphins, recent studies of animal communication have provided considerable insight into the evolutionary origins of human language. What do animals communicate about? How do signals and displays originate? Do animals deceive one another? How do social and physical environments influence communication? Does communication provide a window on the cognitive abilities of animals? These and other questions will be explored in the seminar.

Text: Original source material, discussed in seminar format.

Particulars: No exam. One paper required.

Prerequisites: Biology 141 and 142. Permission of the instructor is required prior to enrollment.

 

BIOLOGY 470 (001): Special Topics in Biology: Sensory Physiology & Perception ***NEW***
Liu, TTh, 11:30-12:45, MAX: 40, 1462 Clifton Road, Room 308

Content: Ever wonder how we are able to construct our perception of the world from the sound waves, odorant molecules, and photons that envelop us? What are these mechanisms and how did they evolve? What consequences does a particular physiological and neural architecture have for how our senses can be fooled? This course will cover common themes across the major sensory modalities of mechanosensation, chemosensation, and photosensation. We will use examples from the single cell to the human to introduce the transduction mechanisms and neural pathways involved in these senses.

Text: Smith, C.U.M. Biology of Sensory Systems. (2000) (John Wiley & Sons)

Particulars: Prerequisites: Biology 141 and 142, Biology 336 (Human Physiology) or Biology 360/NBB 301 (Intro to Neurobiology), or consent of instructor. The course will include lectures, invited speakers, exams, and a project. PRS Interactive Clickers are encouraged.

 

BIOLOGY 475 (000): Biology of the Eye
Edelhauser/Nickerson, MWF, 9:35-10:25, MAX: 30,Emory Clinic B, Calhoun Conference Rm

(Same as IBS 548)

Content: A course designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students who may be interested in a basic understanding of the eye. This course will review basic principles and state-of-the-art information on ocular anatomy, embryology, biochemistry, physiology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, pharmacology, and pathology. This course will provide a fascinating insight into the overall function of the eye.

Text: A course outline will be used with the appropriate text for each lecture.

Particulars: The course will have three didactic lectures with discussion per week. Course grade will be determined by two mid-term exams and one final. Graduate students will be required to write a term paper. Prerequisites: Biology 141 and 142.

Chemistry


468SWR: Perspectives in Chemistry - This is a senior seminar, writing-intensive course that provides a unified perspective of chemistry in our society. Topics will be chosen for novel chemistry, relevance, and societal impact. Students research and write a position paper on each of the topics discussed. Supporting papers and articles are provided for background reading. Class discussions and student presentations with invited domain experts is the usual format.


Psychology

PSYC 103: Brain and Behavior

Edwards, MWF 10:40-11:30, MAX: 120

Content: This is a course about the biology of behavior. Special attention is given to sex, eating, drinking, sleeping and waking. Other topics include: the influence of drugs on behavior, recovery of function after brain damage, and the neural and chemical substrates of pain and pleasure.

Particulars: A good entry course for students interested in physiological psychology/behavioral neuroscience. Two midterm exams with an optional comprehensive exam.

PSYC 215: Cognition
Barsalou,TTh,11:30-12:45, MAX: 100

Content: A general introduction to cognition from the perspectives of cognitive psychology, cognitive science, and cognitive neuroscience. Topics will include the neural and cognitive bases of perception, categorization, attention, memory, knowledge, language, thought, and social cognition. Develops the theme that cognition is grounded in the biology of perception, movement, emotion, and introspection, rather than being disembodied as in traditional theories

 

PSYC 321: Behavioral Neuroendocrinology of Sex
Wallen, TTH, 2:30-4:00, MAX: 40: PSYC=20; NBB=20: TOTAL=40

(Same as NBB 321)

Content: This course examines the role hormones, particularly steroid hormones, play in the development and activation of reproductive behaviors in animals and humans. In addition, the role of hormones in the development of sex differences in the brain and behavior will be explored. The first third of this course covers biological mechanisms of hormone production and the regulation and function of the neuroendocrine system. A background in biology is helpful, but neither required, nor necessary. The concepts necessary to understand the biology of the neuroendocrine system are developed in class. The last two-thirds of the course cover the behavioral effects of hormones and are divided into the immediate effects of hormones (activation) and long-term effects of hormones (organization). Research covers both animals and humans with everything from sex changing fish to sex change in human’s topics for consideration. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the manner in which hormones produce physical modifications and modulate sexual behavior in a variety of species.

Readings : Selected reserve readings.

PSYC 325: Primate Social Psychology (Same as BIO 325)
de Waal, TTH 11:30-12:45, MAX: 80; (PSYC-50/BIOL-30), Rm TBA

Content: Following a general introduction to primatology, this course covers recent progress in the growing field of primate social behavior. Topics range from aggression and dominance (e.g., warfare and power politics among chimpanzees) to affiliation, sex and peaceful coexistence (e.g., parental behavior, behavioral sex differences, conflict resolution). The evolution of the large brain and remarkable intelligence of primates has been explained as related to the complexity of their societies: survival in such societies requires sophisticated social skills and a thorough understanding of the relationship network. Course segments focus on the motivational and cognitive processes underlying coalition formation, reciprocal exchange of benefits, reconciliation following conflict, and the origin of moral systems. Parallels with human behavior will be discussed.

Texts: Required readings include two books and articles assigned at the beginning of the course.

PSYC 350: Behavior Modification

McDowell, MWF 10:40-11:30, MAX: 30

Content: Use the principles of behavior to enhance human functioning. Application of basic research and theory from experimental psychology to personal, social, and educational problems.

PSYC 414SWR: Brain and Cognitive Development
Mills, W, 3:00-5:50, MAX: 15, (NBB-5, PSYC-10), PSYC 332

(Same as NBB 414SWR)

Content: The course examines developmental changes in brain organization linked to different aspects of cognitive development, especially during the first three years of life. The topics cover changes in cerebral specializations linked to sensory processing, attention, memory, face recognition, language and social/ emotional development. Issues pertaining to brain plasticity and the relative contributions of genetic and experiential factors on brain development will also be addressed. Throughout the course we will discuss how research in developmental cognitive neuroscience can influence and constrain general theories of child development.

Particulars: This course fulfills the post-freshman writing requirement.

PSYC 440S: Animal Communication (S (Same as BIO 440S)
Gouzoules, T TH 1:00-2:15, MAX: 16: PSYC=8; BIO=8: TOTAL=16

(Same as BIO 440S)

Content: From the dance of the honey bee, the “honest advertising” of frogs, and the question of why birds sing, to the symbolic abilities of primates and dolphins, recent studies of animal communication have provided considerable insight into the evolutionary origins of human language. What do animals communicate about? How do signals and displays originate? Do animals deceive one another? How do social and physical environments influence communication? Does communication provide a window on the cognitive abilities of animals? These and other questions will be explored in this seminar.

Texts: Original source material, discussed in seminar format.

Particulars: No exam. One paper required. PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR IS REQUIRED PRIOR TO ENROLLMENT.

 

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